Jihad

I pictured the Pentagon and me standing near it. I formed this mental image before I even began making my way through Islam, and it grew clearer the further I got. I knew that the building’s gaping hole from 9/11 had been patched up and a memorial to the victims had been built. I thought I needed to see these things with my own eyes and that somehow the proximity would help me work through lingering issues. Time and experience had given me a new perspective on certain terms that I once found troubling. In the aftermath of 9/11, I heard people say that the word “Islam” itself means “to submit,” implying that the faith is designed to make servants of us all—perhaps with Muslims as our overlords. Now I understood differently. I saw that the submission in question wasn’t vis-à-vis another person, but something entirely private: a shift in perspective. Islam would have me remember that we are pieces of a vast creation, not the creation itself.

I hoped for a similar realization about the word “jihad.” It translated roughly as “holy war,” but I had heard two interpretations. The first, the “greater jihad,” is an inner struggle. I understood this as the effort each of us must put forth to make peace with the human condition—the “one-two punch” of life: granted and revoked. Exertion of this kind tends to grow one’s capacity to contribute to the greater good. But I’d also heard jihad used to refer to “violence waged on behalf of Islam.” Perhaps this was the “lesser” of the two jihads, but it certainly garnered more media attention; in the news, Muslim terrorists are often called “Jihadists.” I wanted this second version to be a misinterpretation, the result of twisted logic used to justify a selfish agenda.

While digging around for information on the Pentagon’s 9/11 memorial, I happened upon an article about the multi-faith chapel that had been constructed when the building was repaired. Apparently, the Pentagon has accommodated a variety of religious services for many years, but never before had a space been specially designated for the purpose. Now the location had been chosen by the nose of an airplane commandeered in the name of religion; the chapel itself was presumably a peaceful pocket within a giant monument to war. The juxtapositions were striking. I knew immediately that I needed to attempt to visit the chapel. Perhaps being there would help me make sense of it. But what were the chances I would be allowed in? Unlike most other places of worship, this one is not open to the public. It’s for Pentagon employees, military personnel, and those granted special authorization.

Several weeks after Ramadan, I sent my first email message to the Pentagon. I had no special contacts. On the Department of Defense website, I found the email address to the Communications Department. I sent my note to “whom it may concern.” Briefly, I explained my situation: I had been a D.C.-based employee for the federal government on September 11, 2001; I was now a writer exploring religion; I hoped to be given permission to visit the Pentagon Chapel. For more than a month, my request bounced around. Public Relations forwarded it to the Office of the Chaplain. Each new contact scooted me along. When my plea came back to the original Communications Department, I had to admit that my chances did not look good. I started again at the beginning, realizing my appeal may never reach a person who could give me the official green light.

So I made my travel plans anyway: Dallas to Austin to D.C. At the very least I’d see that the Pentagon building had been sealed back up and I’d walk around the memorial that looked from pictures like an outdoor sculpture garden. That had been the plan before I knew of the chapel. I told myself it would be okay if my request was denied, that whatever happened was meant to be. The story is that which occurs, after all. You can do your best to sway an outcome, but forces greater than oneself are at play; individual and collective karmas bump and swirl. The future unfolds with a message that might not be easy or fair. I was learning from religion itself: faith is greeting even the most unwelcome events with a level of acceptance.

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